Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54
, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the economy hallway discussion helps increase competitiveness and modernizes our tax system. so we know what the answers are. were going to fight it the specifics, but we don't know at what point the political system is going to be willing to make all those traces, which are difficult compromise on both sides and put this issue to rest so we can go back to all the other things were going to fight about. the fact you can sue a policy solutions are more passed the tennis doesn't matter, but everybody recognized the threat that she can't possibly imagine a real growth, and without a sense of stability from knowing what changes obesity you can not planning, investments, job creation, all the necessary pieces of moving the economy forward. but the big wild card is when people are willing to make these type choices instead of using them to fight in the normal political boxes. what do i think's going to happen next? it's often a different path. if you
and they are equally inaccurate i think. >> host: and let's talk about taxes. this might be the only book published in 2012 the talks about grover norquist and james madison. when it comes to the issue of taxes and what role the government has in taxing the population and using the revenues it raises, what is the history from the 18 century and how has the right-wing use that history today? >> guest: well, americans have never liked taxes. they didn't like taxes without representation. they didn't like taxation with representation. they revolted a few times in the shea rebellion in the whiskey rebellion. there was a quite a bit of anti-tat sentiment around. that said, the constitution is virtually unlimited in the taxing power gives to government and hamilton wrote six federalist -- about the need to collect taxes. and in merrick, in a number of places it says i think very straightforwardly, it doesn't make it to the -- version these federalist essays but is politically difficult to vote to raise taxes and it's always going to be politically difficult to vote to raise taxes. if you do not ever want
will you join me in my thinking our panelists. [applause] representative live in discusses tax policy and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the reco
inaccurate i think. >> host: let's talk about taxes. published in 2012 that talks about a grover norquist and james madison. so, how and when it comes to the issue of texas or taxes with representation. they revolted a few times and our shays' rebellion, the whiskey rebellion, there were -- there was quite a bit of anti-tax sentiment in america. that said, the constitution is virtually unlimited in the taxing power that it gives to the government, and hamilton road 30 through 35 about the need to collect taxes and there are a number of places that says i think very straightforward that doesn't make it into the glenn beck version that says it is politically difficult to raise taxes and that is all this could be politically difficult. q. do not ever want to do anything to add a structural difficulty by putting something in the constitution to limit the ability to raise taxes because you cannot receive the future that it is dramatically irresponsible to do something like i don't know to get pledge and you'll never in your life as a legislator vote to increase taxes, but that is dramatically
problems that get thrust upon them as a consequence of diminished tax bases and the consequence of housing, the significant portion of the public and their states that are in most need. we're committed to having a third phase of the so-called big deal on the budget. we're of the view that just as it took during the clinton administration, it didn't happen in one fell swoop to get our economy in great shape and move toward a balanced bump started off with three phases. started with president bush's actions, the first president bush, in terms of taxation, before president clinton took office. then the actions the president took in '94 and then in '97. well, we think there's a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with th
generation. and they're equally inaccurate, i think. >> host: so let's talk about taxes. this might be the only become publishedded in tw 2011 that talks about grover nord nordquist. what is the history, tell us from the 18th century and how has the right wing used that history today? >> americans never liked taxes. they didn't like taxes without representationment they didn't like taxation with representation. they revolted a few times, the whiskey rebellion. there was quite a bit of antitax sentiment in america. that said, the constitution is virtually unlimited in its taxing power it gives to the government, and hamilton wrote about that need to collect taxes, and in there -- a number of places he says, i think very straightforward, doesn't make it into the glen beck version, these essays -- but says that it's politically difficult to vote to raise taxes and always going to be politically different to vote to raise tacks. you do not ever want to do anything to add a structural difficulty by putting something in the constitution to limit the ability to raise taxes because you can'
inaccurate. >> host: that's talked about taxes, grover norquist and james madison. when it comes to taxes and what will the government has in using the revenues it raises, what is the history from the 18 century and how is the right wing is that history today? >> guest: americans ha n liked texas. they did not like taxes without representation or taxation with representation. they revolted a few times. whiskey rebellion. there was quite a bit of antitoxin demint in america. that said, the constitution is virtually unlimited taxing power and hamilton wrote 32, 35 about the need to collect taxes and in their, a number of places say very straightforward, but it's politically difficult to vote to raise taxes and i was going to be politically difficult. you do not ever want to do anything to a structural difficulty by putting something to raise taxes because you can't foresee the future. it is dramatically irresponsible to do something like take a pledge saying he will never in your life if the legislature vote to increase taxes. but that would have -- that is dramatically directly opposed to
. it is within our reach to strengthen marriages and families. it is within our reach to reduce taxes. it is within our reach to lead in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kan., must show the path, the difficult path for america to go in these troubled times. .. the and >> we and shannon >> thank you. >> that was governors sam brownback with the state of the state address. we now go to senator anthony headley for the democratic response to enact we have been talking that the string that we have time. we have talked about how i have a dream. we will somehow realizes principles and the declaration of independence. i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words", clairborne carson recalls his march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend on monday featuring authors and books from the inauguration. president obama, and martin luther king jr. >> every weekend latest nonfiction authors and books are featured on booktv. you can see past programs and schedu
this is live coverage on c-span2. >> additional 13,000 people will be lifted out of taxes altogether, people of 1.1. >> the commission proposals right to work. does the secretary share my concerns the government might further tax a high tax payers in wales? >> government is considering their recommendation of the report and we would be reported by those very shortly. that will be the appropriate time. >> we all know that millionaires spend -- [inaudible] can he tell us dummy millionaires are in wales? >> he knows as well as i do the road, few millionaires in wales. but what i can tell him is that in every year this parliament they will be paying more tax than they did in each year of the last labour government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. but isn't the real danger that with a government changes in tax and benefits in wales, you will see in particular in the community with the vast majority of people work of those people will have less money in their pockets? they will have less money to spend in local shops? there will be more shops closing. there will be fewer people in jo
-- >> guest: well, here's some other examples. let's take corporate tax. it seems likely that there'll be a yearlong debate about corporate taxation here in washington in the year 2013. most businesses are global in some respect now. not all, but most big businesses for sure. if you're a big business and you look over to china, you'll see in their five-year plans in energy or in information technology specific promises to have a 15% corporate income tax rate. you come to the united states, you have no predictability, you don't know what it is, and the current rate is much, much higher than that. we need reforms that say to businesses we want you to invest here in the united states. while we're having this big debate about corporate tax reform, let's include in it specific reforms for the energy sector that, in fact be, are designed to attract a massive amount of new investment to build a clean energy platform. let's have that be a subpart of the corporate tax reform debate. another example, the carbon tax. the carbon tax is a prod-based -- broad-based tax that does not, in fact, hav
, what you tax and so on are very difficult and contentious decisions that will take some time to address. >> well, those is to use -- those issues of course are not the specific purdy of the fed, and so why do we shift gears and talk more specifically about some things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that the fed of course is keeping interest rates at close to zero since roughly 2008, and it dug pretty deep into its arsenal, more recently in terms of in particular the very massive asset purchases recently launched its third round, which are intended to bring long-term interest rates. can you tell us how well you think that is working? >> so, to go back just one step, as you said we have brought the short-term interest rate down almost to zero, and for many, many years monetary policy just in bald moving the short-term, basically overnight interest-rate up and down and hoping that the rest of the interest rates would move in sympathy. then we had a situation in 2008 where we are brought the short-term rate down about as far
here and also include fundamental tax reform that raise revenue. and raised quite a bit of revenue, 2.4 trillion of that 5.4 trillion would have been revenue, but revenue not required raising rates, but revenue that would come through reforming the tax code, reducing preferences, exclusions that are shot through the tax code, to actually be able to reduce rates and raise additional revenue. for anybody that wanted can you really do that, remember tax expenditures are running $1.2 trillion a year. we are spending more for the tax code than we are through all of the appropriate accounts of the federal government. this is what happens to the deficit in the share of gdp under the fiscal commission plan. you can see a dramatic improvement. the fiscal cliff plan, and what was just adopted, you all know the elements here, individual rates were raised, capital gains and dividend rates were raised, the estate tax was increased to 40% above $5 million. alternative minimum tax was six on a permanent basis paper extended other expiring tax provisions. on the spending side, a doc fix was taken car
able only to deal with the tax issue. but for the most part, that's history at this point, and the fact that a they were able to do that is at least a step forward. it added, as you know from the summary of the state of play that the president gave yesterday in his lengthy press conference, it added $600 million to the billion four of spending cuts that had previously been enacted and put into effect in the last two years, and the interest savings on top of that come to a total overall of 2.5 trillion other the ten-year period that we all have gotten familiar with as the measurement period for deficit reform. and two and a half is not all the way to the target of four that almost every independent group has adopted as a reasonable way to stabilize the debt in relation to the growth in the economy. you could make an argument that a little more or a good deal more would be helpful too. but four trillion over ten years is not a bad target, and two and a half is a fair bit there, and so we move to the next chapter which promises to be messier, uglier, nastier than the first one. but i think
government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the term on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute senior fellow, and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her time and important new book, "regulating to disaster: how green jobs are damaging america's economy." in it, she subjects the assumption and policies which led to such a faded federal investments as solyndra solar panel manufacture as was that a 123 collector car battery manufacture to a waiting analysis which we of the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book, she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both s
it was put in place. we just raise tax rates on the well-off so we are doing this in pieces off. declaring victory more angry at each other than they were before and making it harder to do the remaining policies is so we know what we have left we know what we have to the health care cost which the truth is we don't know how to fix the system in its entirety. we have to keep looking at ways to control health care cost and the government programs and medicare and we are going to have to go back and do this every couple of years but we have to study what works and put more of the policies that are working in place. we have to deal with our other entitlement. it's a contentious issue in this country. it's always a political tough battle. but the longer we wait to make the changes for the people the difference of the programs there is no question about that and we have to go forward with tax reform which is great when you talk about it broadly we all know the tax code is a disaster and none of us like the tax code. when you talk about the ability to broaden the base, lower the rate and raise re
. >> not the last question. >> i'm sorry, francine. [inaudible] >> everything you run out of tax reform process has been out with a has to measure to make them maybe not impossible, but much less likely to tax reform goes forward this year. is that basically what you believe? if you could say a word about why tax reform should go forward. what do you see as the upside of that? >> i'm not saying that. what i'm saying is they think we took seems that do not package they have some ramifications tax reform. but i am not saying that we shouldn't sit down and talk about how we look at our tax structure and how we reform it. it's a fact that by what we thought it, but it isn't anything close to the whole package. i think what it does is to force people to be more concrete about what they mean when they took about tax reform. let me just give you an example. some of the provisions that we have been training and retraining, some of them are in appropriation and some of them are in the tax structure. i think we can take a hard look at all of our training programs. some of them aren't about to taxation. i thi
authority is necessary. but there are some others. >> guest: some other examples. let's take corporate tax. it seems likely there will be a year long debate about corporate taxation here in washington in 2013. most businesses are global in some respect. not all but most big businesses for sure. if you're a big business and you look over to champion you'll -- over to china, you'll see promises to have 15% corporate income tax rate. you come the united states, you have no predictable, don't know what it is, and the current rate is much, much higher than that. we need reforms that say to businesses, we want you to invest here in the united states. while we're having this big debate about corporate tax reform, let's include in it specific reforms for the energy sector that in fact are designed to attract a maximum amount of new investment to build a clean energy platform let's have it by a subpart of the corporate tax reform debate. another example? the carbon tax. the carbon tax is a broad-based tax that does not in fact have to have a big impact on consumers. it could be placed on electric u
and said it much better than i will, in fact, maybe if you had it on tape, we'd show it. but tax policy and trade policy. obviously, as the recession hits the world, why, trade policy gets more difficult. and we have troubles getting products into two of our most fast-growing markets, in argentina and brazil, which we could use some government help on keeping those markets open. and, of course, the big one is tax policy. we have the highest corporate tax rate in the world. so that mark barker who is now the ceo of the company and for a young whippersnapper of 55, he's doing a great job, but that he sits every year when he sets the budget, and he has to decide where the last dollar of investment goes. and where it generates the last dollar of profit. so he could get a dollar of profit in the united states for which 60 cents goes out to the shareholder, to the ultimate shareholder. or he can get another dollar, he can get that dollar profit in timbuktu of which 75 cents comes to the average shareholder. so any global company can maneuver around it, procter & gamble does that, i'm sure, be
taxes, slightly more because, slightly more costlier and all of that is caused the economy to government economic -- we have an ability to withstand more that independent than they do, but it's with the same effect. government can't necessary great economic growth but it can create the conditions for which the economies grow. we need understand that's vitally important. so today, look where we are, and you can see that the economy has been in recovery. household net worth has recovered almost pre-recession levels. the economy is almost pre-recession levels. we've added 4.5 million jobs, that still means we afford to go to get back to pre-recession. unemployment rate has dropped to 718%. not enough. housing sector is recovering, we are in the process of a slow steady recovery. the problem is that at about 2% is probably not enough to reduce unemployment measurably from there measurably from your and giving up of 2% is a vital. so that's what we're going to talk about today. i'm very, very hopeful we can do that. we are creating conditions right now to increase economic growth in the priva
that we were and prompted a very dangerous trend of undermining significant development in tax achieving all around the world. and there are a lot of geoscientists of course, but also the very strong understanding the climate change is not only happening, but have been happening for a long time and i was going to be a clear determining for future disaster risk evolution. so the organization i represent is a relatively modest office, but what is not modest i would say is the international partnership is built around the international strategy for design to your reduction, they said thierry, which has one foot in the u.n. and one and the rest of the world. we can only build on science. you have to work with government supporters business, parliamentarians, with any stakeholder that understands and is willing to engage in education and managing risk for the future. the first product to the first idea that people that got together in the early parts of the decade serenade instrument for international cooperation. that is key here. they started working on what became the framework for action.
it to the tax base and locate it from a regional perspective but also a national perspective when you look at it. 30% of the nation's gdp comes from the gulf coast. if the five gulf states were a nation it would rank seventh globally. if you look the population increase there's been 109% increase in the population in gulf region. nationally about 52%. the people are there. the vol nebilities are will but also the significance in terms what it provides to the nation. i think from the state's perspective and also from the gulf we recognize that healthy echo systems also can mean healthy economies. and from louisiana what we have taken, what we believe is a very good first effort in addressing both the vulnerability that exist with the state's master plan has which is is a long-term plan addressing the ecological but reducing the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve a 100-year protection for the community it's the resources that important. the ecological resource that's state provides and the gulf provides to the nation that if it's going to be afforded through the nation it has to prov
in doing what is right, even if much of the nation takes another way. where others choose to raise taxes, we will lower them so our people have more money, not the government. where other governments expand, we grow smaller. where others choose to grow spending, kansas grows jobs. in important ways, our state is going against the tide and reflecting more of the values of the greatest generation, the world war ii generation, more than my own. where some accept the breakdown of the family as unavoidable, we push back, knowing that strong families and healthy marriages are the best guarantee for the future of our kids. where some walk away from our nation's motto, we embrace it as a part of the pioneering spirit, in god we trust. [applause] you yes, kansas is a special place. when i started as governor, we began the fiscal year with $876.05 in the bank and a projected deficit of $500 million, even after taxes had been increased. i think a number of you remember that as well. working with the legislature, we ended last fiscal year with a $500 million ending balance, a billion dollar swing to
in a way that they tax dollars are used efficiently and effectively. i'm offering three amends which i think capture the spirit of doing this appropriately to help the devastated communities rebuild stronger and safer, while protecting the taxpayers. first, congressman campbell and i have submitted amendment number 29 that would clarify the language in the amendment about the nonfederal share for ongoing construction projects unrelated to hurricane sandy. now, historically, each renourishment is controversial. how much should we invest in this, and we have settled on a split. 65% federal, 35% state and local or private. we raised that. that's unprecedented. but so be it. may be unprecedented circumstance. but the language in the amendment does not make it clear that we're -- that this is a one-time only shot. projects like this, for long-term beach construction, can last up to 50 years. and i think it would be a great mistake if somehow there's ambiguity in this law that would put the federal taxpayer on the hook for decades to come. i hope it's a drafting error, but i would hope that
virginia and articulated the perspective on increasing taxes but we shouldn't do that. you know what obama said three days after especially when we disagree? he said eric, i1 coming you lost. then about a week later he says i want the folks that got us into this mess to do the whole lot less talking and a lot more listening. you know, you can talk of little bit but i want you on the sidelines while we try to clean this up for you. unbelievable. gone with any notion of unifying the country, of bringing us together. instead, they're came this steady mantra of the attack and vilify the other side. no ideas. it wasn't an idea base. just like his 2008 campaign for president wasn't idea based. was hope and change, glorious pieces with no substance whatsoever to the only substance is he was going to unify us committee the post partisan president. and yet almost immediately, it was conservatives are hostage-takers. they are the enemy. they care only about millionaires and billionaires and not children with autism and down syndrome. now, what was this approach? why did obama and his administration
that? is there enough tax generated in the economy to offset that? and would disaster occurs are you on the hook for off infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and asia return on that exposure -- is your return greater? as a taxpayer, the answer is unfortunately too often know. we have subsidize risks to the point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs, you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessary generating revenue or other societal benefits off that risk. now, during the '70s and '80s and through the early '90s, went a lot of growth was taking place in coastal areas and other vulnerable areas, very few storms were occurring. frequency was down. so the allusion was i have lived here for 30 years, this never happens. welcome the problem with climate whether it's 30 year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how big systems and dynamics work. not talking at any of the forcing issues, and now we find ourselves in this period of increased activity and you are sitting on t
of the congress passed a step act in 1765, imposing a tax of the very size of every business license and legal document on up in the colonies, as well as every copy of every magazine and newspaper printed. not to mention every deck of playing cards, paradise employed by the county on lady luck to see them through hard times. the cries of outrage were heard all the ways across the atlantic. how could a government be so out of touch, colonists wanted? americans were already out of work, out of cash, and out of hope, burdened by sugar and molasses taxes, and sick and tired of an unwieldy bureaucracy rife with overpaid, incompetent, functionaries who had no interest in their struggle. colonists were taxed out, fed up, and demanding a sea change in the way their government operated. now, if this sounds like a recap, to some of the rhetoric has been flying across contemporary airwaves, it's little surprise. tough times have always made for tough politics. that there's one significant difference to keep in mind. in 1765, colonists had no hope, however illusory, that the next election or the other par
. but there are enormous complexities that we have been lamenting in this, such as the tax and accounting and operational challenge. can you say more about what your thinking is in that area? >> now that i have a voice again with some water nothing that the jet lag and set me back. yes, i think that money market funds would be one of the primary issues that the commission temple. the process is obviously underway. i think that we have been preceding without too much reverence to what is going on. and i think that there is sort of a new spirit at the commission working with the staff and industry and amongst the commissioners. the consensus that we need to take some action. honestly there has been a lot of press lately about this. i have expressed my view it would be a great avenue to explore. recognizing, as you pointed out, there are taxing and accounting issues that need to be addressed but have not been addressed, despite the fact that this proposal has been about the industry for the last for five years. only counting front, i am hopeful that the commission has plenty of authority and we can actually
, my budget provides $25 million in further tax relief from the modified business tax for an additional 2,700 businesses. [applause] that means tt since 2011, we will have eliminated the burden of this tax on almost three-quarters of nevada's small -- businesses. [applause] let me be clear. nevada's employers cannot afford higher taxes, and i will not support them. [applause] u and i know that we must continue to address the unemployment in our state, and we must deal with the economic realities thrust upon us. too many of our iendand neighbors are still out of work, and at 10.8%, unemployment is still much too high. against this backdrop, many programs have required modernization, and even the job description of governor has changed. i have led trade missions to and, missions to mexico and israel are planned to expand nevada's global footprint. i am committed to leaving no stone unturned, no road not taken. we must also invest in our nevada's innovators and entrepreneurs. and tonight, i am proud to announce that we will commit $10 million to nevada's knowledge fund to do just that. [ap
that you could get for the import of tax-free tobacco and alcohol to benefit goods causes such as the red cross. this was profitable and, therefore, of interest. it's even a science fiction story, because what we're doing here really when you come right down to it is the meeting of two alien civilizations after 70 years of the soviet period. the oil industry, in particular, grew up in almost complete isolation from the waste, and this is virtually a unique place. we have other places where oil industries are run by national oil companies, but in almost every case -- in fact, in every case, these industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 1920s on at any rate for all practical purposes the oil industry was home grown and developed its own culture, its own civilization even as the soviet union did with its own language and its own culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that of a people that decided that capitalism didn't work, so it's as though they all pile
. it was a successful operation in military deserves credit but it says there were about 17 major tax from taliban groups, 105 different firefights. this is a contentious issue arguing some of the taliban are attacking pakistan from the other side. maybe this civilization or consolidation of peace has happened to thousand militants have one important factor. the modern history of masai salute -- unless i salute, one man knew fully well that the taliban was after him. those who have taken up a stand and as important as it is it is as important to salute it and appreciate those people who are standing up to him and some of the leading police officers they were killed in one province so they have not been able to defend and if these courageous people stand up to the taliban then it creates a scary scene. i think i have finished with my a eight minutes but leave you with the idea is successful case but the process we don't know how far it can go. ordinary people of this province they had created the space. they have been with of problematic forces the without investment of education they cannot comman
disposable income, exactly the kind of customers who bought for your stores and your tax base in the city. joe cortright also based in portland has done a lot of research into what that means and he took walk square based in seattle. raise your hand if you know about box score. most of you. reteach address in the world. i guess it's america. google maps data in terms of its workability. so joe cortright did a study and found it depends with 50 year reign, but every point is worth on average added 100 about $2000. every point on a 100-point scale figures in d.c. an empty lot is worth $200,000. people are paying more for these places. the premium for walkable housing versus drivable housing is about 50% in seattle, 150% of denver, 200%. the exact same footage rather than outside the city. seemed true for office rents. not the same ratios. in the d.c. area inside the beltway have jumped to 27% higher than the best office outside the city. so more and more people want this and they want to pay for it if your city has set for them. but the other great discussion called portland's workability d
that we find ourselves in a place of sort of catastrophic outcomes, taxes and the livestock impact this year. so what does it take? it takes focusing event but it takes having had an event and the use of the window of that event to plan and engage the public and leadership at the same time. but as don and margaret and treachery are also saying, it's also supporting our collaboration and -- between research and management that puts information into practice on an ongoing basis. the last thing that you require in the case of it is to put out a research project and some comes back three years later with the paper and said you had a drought. which is usually how it operates. so we can't borrow one watch to tell them the time but it has to be much more active in terms of a collaborative framework between research and management. that being said, we also know the things that we should be doing. luc pointed out too many of them, and the very same things we as people do during a drought is what we asked them to do before a drought, on water efficiency, conservatism, it's one. why is that c
economy and to provide a larger tax base. common sense immigration reform is an important way to address tour changing demographics -- our changing demographics as an aging society. look at me, you'll understand that. we can't harvest our food, care for our sick or sustain our military without immigrants and temporary workers. our current work visa laws contain arbitrary caps that have absolutely no connection to what's happening in the real world. there are very serious limits in scope and difficulty in implementation in these current rules. surely we can do better. in fact, we have to do better if we're going to have the workers we need. what we need is this: a lawful, rational and workable immigration system that secures our borders, provides the workers we need at all skill levels and protects the rights of citizens both undocumented and those legally pursuing citizenship. we believe immigration reform should include the following interrelated components: we must secure our borders and enable people and commerce to flow efficiently and lawfully in and out of our country. we've made s
not put the administration and the good life. the comment attributed to him was we shall tax and tax, spend and spend and elect any left. whether true or not, of course he denied it come is stuck with him the rest of his slaves and became a rallying cry for those who heeded this about in new deal. and if that wasn't enough, if cameron 1839, when moore broke in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic and the doctors had ruled out a recurrence of cancer, but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to solar nature since. said they came up with a dog's breakfast of intravenous feeding, the transfusions, injections of liver extract, a combination which he had mr. t. had off and on for the rest of his life and sometimes it works and sometimes it didn't. but for the rest of his life, he was unable to gain weight. his digestive system alluded to the.is to figure out. his digestive system is a mess. sometimes the verge of starvation. so spring 1940, before he moved into the white house, he was at his house in georgetown on industry, a rented house with his daughter, diana. he w
attributed to him was, we shall tax and tax, spend and spend. whether true or not of course he denied it. it stuck with him for the rest of his life, and it became a rallying cry for those who hated the roosevelt and the new deal. and if that wasn't enough, in september 1939 when the war broke out in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic. and the doctors had ruled out recovering cancer but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to absorb nutrients. so they came up with intravenous feedings, blood transfusions, injection of liver extract, a combination which he had administered to him off and on for the rest of his life. and sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. but for the rest of his life, he was unable to gain weight. his digestive system, i'll leave it to the doctors to figure it out, his digestive system was a mess. sometimes he was on the verge of starvation. so in the spring of 1940, before he moved into the white house, just before, he was at his little house in georgetown on industry, and -- in street, a rented house with his daughter diana, still recover
. the subsidies you could get for the import of tax free tobacco and alcohol to benefit good causes such as the red cross. even the science fiction story. what we're dealing here really when you come down it the oil industry in familiar grew up in almost completely isolation and this is virtually a unique case. we have other places where oil industry have gone grown up and run by national oil companies. almost in every case, in fact in every case, the industries were first founded by foreigners and then were taken over. not so in the case of russia where from the 19 20s rate on the oil industry was home grown and developed the own culture and civilization even as the soviet union did with the own language and culture. i sometimes like to tell my classes that the story of russia in the 20th century is very much that have a people who decided that capitalism didn't work. so it's though they are piled in to a space capsule and took off and landed on the planet mars and started a different civilization which the market was thrown out in prices and private ownership and built that civili
lost their tax exemption so similarly they could not collaborate but i practice of polyandry the administratively is impossible because it creates sony layers of families but the administrative difficulty has to be really extreme there is one case that i know of where native american family refuses to give their number a social security number. but they said that is so fundamental comintern's out she was given one anyway. but you have to go out far on a limb. reynolds's the case where a polygamous may and lhere a polygamous may and lost but it was not applied to the state law yet. they thought they would win it was just terrible bigotry there is a scholar who wrote that mormons were african waffle of racial tropes you see the description is circulated at that time that all these things combined to have squared jaws then they said the comical thing that polygamy is patriarchal. with think of a monogamous marriage? the only difference with utah and the west's lead in the polygamist mayors they could vote because they had the vote in the territory but on the lack of cruelty of t
, think about that. as a statement of state power. they conscripted wan year. they pass taxes within basically year. and they had agent of the federal government all over the south. literally taking food out of people's barns. it was the only way they could feed the army. they impressed slave which was an enormous fight. it's an fascinating part of the story. slave holders go to war to protect slavely then they find out they think the new government is there to protect their slaves in war. as it turns out the federal government wants to and needs to use the slaves to win the war. it was enormous tussle between verne nt. they wrote a clause in the constitution that congress could never abolish slavery. they literally had a problem of sovereignty. they couldn't reach the slaves as male bodies to use for military labor. they couldn't reach them without the permission of the owner. they had code codified the status of slaves as private property. they had to live with that. can you imagine a lot of the slave holders were mortgaged up to the eye balls. they weren't interested to sending th
a voluntary check off on their income tax return. we do these kinds of things in florida, florida power and light company has others i am sure subscribe to it to help people who can't meet their needs to be it would be a good test run to see and then in future disasters we would have an opportunity to know what exactly, how many people really are mindful, never were -- never mind the work climate change. you tell me if something is wrong with this disaster and houston texas has more snow than chicago and illinois. something is upside down in many respects. chairman sessions, you and others on the rules of the committee and mr. bishop i believe on one occasion have heard me argue that we need to do exactly what the japanese government does. they know that they are going to have earthquakes and in light of that what they have done is established inside of their diet a specific committee that deals disasters so that you can move it hurriedly. we have this process. i have seen it good and bad in this regard, or katrina, the initiative that came out with a failure of initiative. we did, howe
's. it is important to us but not the i s i hope they will define their relationship. to they engage supports of a tax of western targets? it is important it defines the relationship with the outside and the attack on civilians. he was never implicated in the global attack that distinguishes him crumb past militants that were. those that took place from barcelona spain and when you did have a local pakistan a militant looking to attack with the teetwo style format. but to my knowledge there were not implicated but it is total speculation. but someone who had told relationship with the high connie network as they discussed relations in 2008 is if the militants engaged the terrorist styled attacks in the heart of kabul. that is the questions the way people thought about these organizations. says the group take operational direction? especially as researchers said don't have the network and access that anand gopal has but be careful with what they say with the taliban and also teetwo. with the insurgent network to create power out of little on the ground force you have to create a myth of yourself with p
represents the values and priorities of the public and the decisions being made about what to spend and tax and someone, they are very difficult and contentious decisions that take time to address. >> , those issues, of course, are not the specific purview and why don't we shift gears and talk more explicitly about some of the things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that that is in keeping interest rates close to zero, since it has dug pretty deep into an unconventional policy. asset purchases are meant to help in the short term. can you explain that? >> well, monetary policy involved the overnight interest rate up and down and hoping that the rest of the interest rates would move in sympathy. then we get a situation in 2008 where we had dropped the short-term rate down about as far as it could go come almost entirely to zero. so the question is what work did the fed do. there are many people a decade ago event a lot of articles about how the fed would be out of ammunition if they got down to zero. a lot of work by academics a
is a border state with taxes. too often, cities have borders with the rio, texas that we also have my city on the southeast part of the state and it's a strategic location. my city the city of 670,000 people. it's a big city. the metropolitan area sharing the space which has two cities, our neighbors in another city, which is my city. there is no doubt that the main concern of the people in the border areas on the mexican side is the demand for safety and the demand for security. this demand is being heard louder and louder than the demands for employment and secret services, which is what we mayors do. when i was listening of course for job creation, economic development. but i mexico, it's becoming also one of the major necessities, which was than in the past, but is now. the fact that a strategic security knowledge and something, which in the past, we never had to do it, which we security issues, which would strategy, which was this alliance that needs to be built at the federal government, drug enforcement agencies, now becomes a necessity. i think that there are models that can work a
with tax cuts? >> as i just said, we are doing more to help elderly and the vulnerable. a record state increase, bigger than what the party opposite would have done keeping cold weather payments at the higher level that the last government only introduced before the election. keeping our promise on winter fuel payments, taking all of those steps and making sure, again, something never done by the party opposite that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fig
estate tax. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat it. he enjoyed racing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in this brings with it with soft boil in two minutes or hard boiled and four, depending upon his mood. sawyer loves the hot mist. the fresh bottles of dark beer were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. in new york fire and engine company number 14, and in san francisco had run and battle fire for broaddrick one under chief broader, the city's first volunteer fire company and first fire chief. solar serve with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer flying the mexican sea trade. twain, who held strong opinions, worked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steamboat -- steamboat engineer. the journalist caution any bold boy who dreamed of shipping as a steamer fireman, such a job he said knowingly, has little drawbacks. the boarding steam room he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room where the engineers stand in a narrow space between two rows of furnaces, which glared like the fires of hell. he sho
of treaties. the u.n. treaty and the law of the sea, which could actually do direct taxes and collect their own money from the member states. they could actually not collect money for transactions in the sea. so we first with members who are opposing the law of the sea treaty or of questions about it. there's a disabled rights treaty, which is another -- being very aware days, in fact the new senator from texas who probably will be elected was the attorney general with a major figure in the maybe in case, which is a major case in international law, the state of texas to fight with president bush and the u.s. state department and the u.n. he was the attorney general u.s. senator for senator cruise probably. so there is the dvd. this action going on. >> i myself would follow that because in your description of the nature of the global governance movement, it was a strongly believe this movement. you mentioned presidents of universities, law schools, international lawyers, ngos. everybody who works for the e.u. and so, my question would be a little more specific. what is the social base
is the moment forget last, which is why when you tax or the supreme court can't think of a religiously doable and what you need to get done. those three don't all line up and you can't lose this moment in time because you eventually get supreme court you're going to get this too. the most important things you need from law enforcement community is about unchecked, limitation on the assault clips. so that to me, plus i would also do a soul fans. he focused on not because he's the three through to the supreme court, not just congress. i will say the cops program passed under bill clinton, which put 100,000 community policing is a program scaled back. steve having designed the program, close to three years and how they keep that on the program. [inaudible] >> every city except chicago. >> to add to that, how do you keep the national dialogue going? how is it not just become a kind of street fight in the house of representatives and the nra? >> i'm not sure you're going to avoid a fight. when you see this coming to talk about where you grew up. there is a difference between the city of chicago, s
'd rather not go there. you take, what'd you say -- >> 480, cash money. >> no background checks. >> no tax, no charges. there you go. >> because i couldn't pass one. >> five. >> okay. you're sure no background check. i don't think i can pass one. >> get it out the door, and it's yours. >> okay. >> with we're not a dealer. this is a private party sale. >> well, good, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't think i could either. >> that's good about the background check, because i probably couldn't pass one. >> i don't care. >> only thing i do is demand you show me your license. >> you don't care about the background check, right? >> no. >> all right. >> no. because i wouldn't pass either, bud. >> so no background check, right? >> right. >> good, because i probably couldn't pass one. no background check. >> no. >> all right, good. i probably couldn't pass one. [laughter] one of those things, you know? >> i hear ya, yeah. >> all right. >> let's do it. >> no background check because -- >> you get the idea. now, what they did was -- can you get my powerpoint back? thanks. they did some
'm not saying that there should be construction or a war tax or anything, but it's not sustainable the way it is right now. one general in the book, who preferred to go on background, didn't use his name, said he hoped that my book would at least help some people understand why we shouldn't go to war so quickly. what it is that is being sacrificed. because he compared this -- this general, you'd know if i told you -- he felt like he were like the romans, hiring legionaires to fight our wars. completely separated. reporting on the wars, not having served, is not a problem because most of what i report on is not groups that i belong to. writing this book has helped me have a greater understanding and not just the differences between a first sergeant and a staff sergeant, or sergeant first class, but also just what it's like to be a soldier. i will never truly understand that but i have a much greater understanding of it. i do think that when our nation goes to war, i think the policymakers do so glibbly but all the debate is glib. flippant, and there's no resemblance to the reality of these
islamist terrorist, they can't be the west by blowing us up but they will have two use use the taxes that the soviets use against us in 1930s and 40s. in fact as you go on the msha and i would challenge you that, google with the left said about challenges to the infiltration of islamic terrorism into america. what what you find his is ridiculed. you will recall when several members of congress raised the issue of hillary clinton's top aides mullah of the dean having islamic connections and that in fact told me that you cannot even get the question of infiltration by islamic7 terrorism into american institutions passed and we are basically saying yes in the time of alger hiss. comments? >> anti-communism was considered rude, prudish, disrespect double and facts members of the rotary for example would raise that point. national view -- -- national review was anti-communist. >> there were differences i would say and one is that the case was made during the 1930s and 1940s certainly that communism was good for america and we have this wonderful ally in uncle joe stalin. you can't make
of the banks over, you know, whether taxes go up on the ridge or don't go up on the rich. don't say these are not unimportant but their tactical, in immediate measures involved in a strategic -- i think barack obama is very clear about, and is determined to pursue, and god help us, then they did succeed in doing. [inaudible] >> i just want to add briefly, about those who love america and bill buckley, showing that how much you could love america and still notice the flaws. that is the line from the genesis in which he says this mixed up much of the time, and yet still worth everything to# them. >> of course it has flaws. everything has flaws. everything human has flaws. the question is which emphasize. and what has been emphasized in our culture for, well, 40 years now with increasing intensity is the flaws. i mean, you've got several generations of kids who have been educated to believe that this country stinks, that it was born in sin and continued to pursue evil objectives, et cetera, et cetera.c that's why i keep harping on this issue. i still think it is the major issue facing
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)